Featured

A Habit of Gratitude

It is impossible to overstate the importance of developing good habits. In children, good habits develop their character. 
 
Parents of young kids work on teaching the habits of hygiene and good manners.
But perhaps the most important habit we can teach our children is the habit of gratitude. Gratitude enlarges the brain and develops empathy for others. Gratitude reflects a heart of understanding towards others. Gratitude enlarges the number of friends one has—because grateful people are happy people. In his book The Happiness Advantage Shawn Achor recommends that folks keep a gratitude journal. Achor is one of more than a dozen authors who recommend this practice for keeping us on track with a grateful heart. Today book stores and office supply stores stock a variety of cute gratitude journals—but what other ways can we model gratitude for our kids and others in our lives?
When my children were small one ‘game’ we played was a “go-around” in the car while everyone yelled one thing they were grateful for that day. We started the list with ‘A’ and tried to keep it going till we got to ‘Z’ and someone had to be grateful for the ever- present zebra.
Did this one habit change the lives of my adult children? Well, it helped! I can safely affirm that claim. While some sour-faced toddlers grew into temperamental preteens and moody adolescents, my clan— for the most part— learned to handle emotions with a more steady and calm assurance that
situations change and generally, with work, circumstances improve. 
When we first moved to Houston, Ted was pursuing a doctorate.  Times were tight. Our daughter was going to public school which meant LUNCH MONEY!!! Naturally, before sending our first grader off to school we often had to play “find the change in the couch cushions.” Not only was this a great way to avoid negative thinking during that time but it taught her that there could be FUN in the hard times! A side benefit: now that she is a mom of six children, she has mastered that game with her own kiddos years later!
Did we accomplish this grateful thinking 100% of the time— no. I lean toward the pessimistic side of the street while Ted resides permanently on the sunny side of life.
GRATITUDE IS WORK FOR ME—ESPECIALLY IF I HAVE MY FOCUS ON THE CIRCUMSTANCES. But this was the big lesson for our kids:
DO NOT FOCUS ON THE CIRCUMSTANCES
Reaping the benefits of gratitude today, I see my happy grandchildren often writing “thank you” notes in whatever imaginary handwriting they employ for the day.  They have been thankful for snails, frisbees, friends, and chocolate chips.  A recent conversation went like this…
Me, “ Thank you for the sweet note. Can you read it to me?”
Darling grandchild, “This says thank you for the cookie.”
Me, “What cookie?”
“The one you are going to give me, Silly.”
Gratitude has its pay off! 
Featured

Why Do I Have to Practice Parenting?

We practice law. We practice medicine. Who practices parenting?

We practice law. We practice medicine. Shouldn’t we practice parenting?

FamilyEaster2017Practice parenting. That is what you are going to go with?”

My poor husband was baffled. After 15 months of talking about reopening my blog to discuss the phenomenon of being the parent to ALL adult children he was sure I would have a better title that PRACTICE!!

“Why do you have to practice this? You have been a mom for almost 40 years. Aren’t you a pro already?”

As a matter of fact, I am a pro. Dictionary.com defines  a professional is someone who is engaged in a profession. (Don’t you love when the definition tells you nothing?) But the word profession is defined as an occupation, especially one that requires PROLONGED training! (Emphasis all mine!).

I have been a parent over three decades and I have been ‘in training’ every day.

Check that one! I am a pro!

But the word practice is used to mean the carrying out or exercise of a profession. Of course you have most often heard this in the use of a law practice of the practice of medicine. Obviously we would all love to read a physician’s post after 35 years of treating the common cold on how to avoid the germs and make the illness pass more quickly, right? If an attorney who have been practicing a quarter of a century posts on how to draw up the unbreakable contract you would read that, right? Sure! 

So here I am: professional parent (because of the INTENSE and EXTENSIVE  training) and I am putting out my shingle to say: Welcome to my practice! 

Lots of us think we are still in the business of practicing— like Little League baseball: show up every day from 3-5 and take a swing and a miss until you get it right. Hence, my tagline: everything worth doing is worth practicing. That should let the readier know: I am still swinging and missing at being a parent to adults…but I am willing for you to grab a seat and watch me swing.

What I REALLY want from the readership is a lot of armchair coaches who can comment on how to better swing at how to celebrate your grown kids when they do something GREAT, like have a birthday! I hope to get coaching advice on posts about when to give advice to your kids and when to take the advice they are giving you.

My goal is that PRACTICE PARENTING can be both a sounding board for when we royally mess this up and an advice column when we truly want and need help. 

 

 

 

 

SURVIVING DISAPPOINTMENTS: INFERTILITY

Rachelle sleeping with baby Tate

This is a series on how to survive the disappointments that come to our adult children. I would love your feedback and insight with ideas on how YOU have survived and helped your children survive. These are the topics in the series:

  • Disappointed by an untrustworthy friend?
  • Disappointed in a job situation?
  • Disappointed in academic possibilities?
  • Disappointed in marriage? 
  • Disappointed with infertility?
  • Disappointed with rebellion from their children?

 

TODAY: DISAPPOINTED BY INFERTILITY

 

th

 

Do you see that sweet smile on my girl’s face?  The reward for her six years of waiting is holding tightly to her hand. 

Six year of tests. Six years of supplements. Six years of pain and disappointment. Six years of tears and screams.

Infertility has MANY FORMS!

Once a dear friend of ours struggled for ten years to conceive again after the birth of her first son. When she asked for prayer because of her infertility, a misinformed friend said, “You don’t have infertility! You have a child!”

Rachelle (my daughter above), endured two miscarriages between babies two and three. Then she endured FOUR more baby deaths between Juliet (baby five) and Tatum (the baby in the picture). My heart went through the blender every time I got the call…”there’s no heartbeat,” “the baby didn’t make it,” “things aren’t right.”

th-3

 

I stood holding the phone with no arms or legs—I couldn’t run from the pain or take up my machete and kill the agony. There were never any answers, only lots of questions:

  • We love each other. We are married. We try to raise our kids in a godly manner. Why would God punish us by taking our baby?
  • Am I doing something wrong?
  • Is my husband at fault?
  • Why does God not want us to have any children?

 

th-1

When there is no answer to a question parents should not offer an answer. 

Our kids don’t need our answers, they need our shoulder and our ears. We need to allow weeping and screaming. 

 

th-3

 

Don’t be alarmed if their anger is directed at God. Don’t be alarmed if their anger is directed at you. Don’t be alarmed if you feel their anger is out-of-control.

During the angry outbursts, offer your shoulder and your prayers. If the angry outbursts persist for months suggest counseling. Offer to pay for the counselor if money is a challenge.

th

If instead of anger your child suffers depression follow the same procedure but insist on counseling–the consequences are MUCH more severe.

The inability to conceive a child morphs other pain. Infertility needs love and support–never condemnation or harshness.

 

 

I would love to hear how you helped your adult children through this terrible disappointment. Please leave your comments below.

 

th-4

 

Everyone who leaves a comment below will receive a download poster of scriptures for strength and healing.

 

 

 

 

SURVIVING DISAPPOINTMENTS: MARRIAGE

th

This is a series on how to survive the disappointments that come to our adult children. I would love your feedback and insight with ideas on how YOU have survived and helped your children survive. These are the topics in the series:

  • Disappointed by an untrustworthy friend?
  • Disappointed in a job situation?
  • Disappointed in academic possibilities?
  • Disappointed in marriage? 
  • Disappointed with infertility?
  • Disappointed with rebellion from their children?

 

TODAY: DISAPPOINTED IN MARRIAGE

I never thought this would happen to me.

We were best friends. Now I am losing my husband and my best friend.

If you loved me mom, you would set up an intervention in our marriage. 

 

“I just don’t know what to tell you. I have never been through this.” This was my harsh statement to my daughter when she was going through a divorce.

I was terrified. I WAS HELPLESS! 

I had never experienced divorce or known anyone closely that had been through this horrific experience.

HOW WAS I GOING TO DEAL WITH THIS? 

  • Did I fail her?
  • Was she failing me?
  • What could we have controlled?
  • Should I have refused to go to the wedding?
  • Was this doomed from the start? 

“This is totally illogical! He has never acted this way before! Why is he acting this way?” My response to my second daughter as she went through divorce was not much better. It never occurred to me that SUPPORTING MY GIRLS was the skill I was missing. 

I believed the only way to help was  to fix the marriage and bring the husband back home and put the happy family back together.

FEAR OF MY INABILITY PARALYZED ME FROM BENEFITTING MY ADULT DAUGHTERS. 

 

th-1

 

Some things I thought that ARE NOT TRUE:

  • I need to villainize the future ex.  (This invalidates all the character training you have given your child. We are tempted to say terrible things about another human being.)
  • I need to come up with ways to distract her from the pain. (This invalidates the need to process her pain.)
  • I need to be available 24/7. (This invalidates legitimate boundaries, always needed in an emotional situation.)

 

th-2

Best practices to support during marriage disappointments:

  • Recommend a therapist or counselor that you KNOW has given good advice in the past
  • Speak truth into the situation
  • Offer to watch children so the couple can get away and reconnect
  • Cry–be emotionally supportive during this heartbreaking time–be empathic
  • Encourage both parties to see their way into a better future

th-3

What are some ways you have helped your adult children recover from disappointment in marriage? I would love to hear your comments on how you supported your dear ones during this difficult times.

THIS WEEK ANYONE WHO COMMENTS BELOW WITH ONE IDEA ON HOW TO ENCOURAGE WILL RECEIVE A DOWNLOADABLE MINI-POSTER OF SCRIPTURES THAT ENCOURAGE STRENGTH.

 

SURVIVING DISAPPOINTMENTS: SCHOOL

This is a series on how to survive the disappointments that come to our adult children. I would love your feedback and insight with ideas on how YOU have survived and helped your children survive. These are the topics in the series:

  • Disappointed by an untrustworthy friend?
  • Disappointed in a job situation?
  • Disappointed in academic possibilities?
  • Disappointed in marriage? 
  • Disappointed with infertility?
  • Disappointed with rebellion from their children?

 

TODAY: ACADEMIC POSSIBILITIES

They said ‘no;’ I have to accept that I am not going to be a doctor.

I lost my scholarship. I am coming home and looking for a waiter job.

It just isn’t the kind of school I thought it was.

I don’t know how I failed that class! I worked so hard!

All their grammar school and upper level years our kids dream of  doing something GREAT with their lives. We assure them that they are the BEST AND BRIGHTEST.

Even if they struggle with school, we work hard to find THEIR THING and steer them in the path for them.

th-3

And then it happens: they get a rejection letter from their favorite college or their SAT scores just NEVER get up high enough to apply to the university they have cheered for since second grade.

 

 th-6

What do you do when your star child gets rejected? Do you bad mouth the university? Do you talk about God’s will being at some other place?

Once I remember even assuring my child that her spouse was somewhere else (turns out I was right!).

The death of a dream is never an easy funeral.

th-7

 

Gone are the days when a band aid and a kiss would make the pain go away.  This is gut-wrenching hurt and the dear one’s self-image can take a nose dive with this rejection. What is needed during this time is a new identity lesson. Ephesians 1:4-12

According as he hath chosen us in him before the foundation of the world, that we should be holy and without blame before him in love:

Having predestinated us unto the adoption of children by Jesus Christ to himself, according to the good pleasure of his will,

To the praise of the glory of his grace, wherein he hath made us accepted in the beloved.

In whom we have redemption through his blood, the forgiveness of sins, according to the riches of his grace;

Wherein he hath abounded toward us in all wisdom and prudence;

Having made known unto us the mystery of his will, according to his good pleasure which he hath purposed in himself:

10 That in the dispensation of the fulness of times he might gather together in one all things in Christ, both which are in heaven, and which are on earth; even in him:

11 In whom also we have obtained an inheritance, being predestinated according to the purpose of him who works all things after the counsel of his own will:

12 That we should be to the praise of his glory, who first trusted in Christ.

 

It is important when our kids have been academically or intellectually REJECTED that we remind them that they have already been ACCEPTED with WISDOM AND PRUDENCE…it is all about TIMING!!!

 

th-5

 

Hindsight is always 20/20, so it is very possible that ONE DAY the rejection will TRULY appear as a blessing but for the hurting time words of affirmation and a reminder of the child’s TRUE IDENTITY are most needful.

 

th-4

Stories of academic rejection from your kids?

I would love for you to share below.

Subscribe and comment below!

 

 

 

SURVIVING DISAPPOINTMENT: JOBS

How do we support our adult children when they lose a job or are disappointed in their career?

This is a series on how to survive the disappointments that come to our adult children. I would love your feedback and insight with ideas on how YOU have survived and helped your children survive. These are the topics in the series:

  • Disappointed by an untrustworthy friend?
  • Disappointed in a job situation?
  • Disappointed in academic possibilities?
  • Disappointed in marriage? 
  • Disappointed with infertility?
  • Disappointed with rebellion from their children?

 

TODAY: DISAPPOINTED IN A JOB SITUATION

I thought they supported me.

 

They promised me a pay raise and it has been six months and they still haven’t come through. I can’t work for people who don’t keep their word! 

 

The military has been my life–but I give up. I am coming home.

 

 

th-17

 

Devastation comes when one of your adult children endures a career or military service that continually demoralizes them.

Young adults see bright futures of possibilities ahead of them. When those dreams die part of their light goes out. In this age of skepticism, our adult children do not need many excuses to give up hope on their world.

 

th-9

Loss of hope diminishes the enjoyment of  activities they once loved. The drain of their day-to-day job leaves them feeling hopeless .

 

Disappointment in careers may be the last straw in an already heavy load threatening to break their enthusiasm for life.

When our son felt hopeless in his military career, he struggled with depression. He couldn’t figure which came first: the depression or the job trouble. Having begun a great career as a Marine, things fell apart when he returned from Afghanistan. What he believed would be his lifetime career became a slow crawl to honorable discharge.

 

th-14

Often depression and anxiety mark the first signs that our adult children need a break from their current work life.

Nothing rocks the world of a young professional quite like being let down concerning a job promotion or raise.

 

 

th-12

One of our daughters enjoyed HUGE success as an entrepreneur with an innovative idea of “toy rental” much like Netflix– when they sent DVDs to your home to view and you returned for more.  At the top of her game, she went on nationwide television to secure more investors. Her company skyrocketed and she made numerous television and radio appearances promoting her company. Then…the bottom fell out. Within three weeks her inventory was confiscated, her building was locked, and her investors were gone. The devastation was REAL. She and our son-in-law packed up their apartment in California and moved back to Texas. Then it was our turn to comfort our kids.

 

th-7

 

A blow to the head is not as painful as a blow to the heart when our adult kids are wrecked from unfulfilled expectations and disappointment in business.

 

 

th-15

A young son serving in a leadership position with a promising military career lost his prestige and advancement when he was FALSELY accused of gender and religious discrimination. His parents rallied behind him and supported him–ALWAYS assuring him they believed in him. They couldn’t change the circumstances but they did CHANGE his despairing outlook on the situation.

Their support said, “We know YOU! This is not YOU! This is a bad situation which will make you stronger. YOU can overcome this.”

 

When it comes to disappointment in their careers our best response is: You are a person of respect and integrity and that WILL SHINE THROUGH.

 

th-4

Remind your adult child of the truth of their worth. Don’t allow this ONE incident to define them. Remind them of all the stories of their victories! Celebrate what they have overcome and what they have accomplished.

 

th-5

Do not be DRAMATIC! Do not raise the volume of the situation. Do not predict disaster–they already fear that. Stand firm in your faith in your child. Open up your possibilities to why this might be THE VERY BEST EVENT. Turn the narrative in their favor.

Keep praying. Keep smiling and keep believing in them!

 

th-6

Has your adult child been let go from a job? Fired or dismissed? I would love to hear your comments of how you showed support!

 

Surviving Disappointments: Bad Friends

 

This is a series on how to survive the disappointments that come to our adult children. I would love your feedback and insight with ideas on how YOU have survived and helped your children survive. These are the topics in the series:

  • Disappointed by an untrustworthy friend?
  • Disappointed in a job situation?
  • Disappointed in academic setbacks?
  • Disappointed in marriage? 
  • Disappointed with infertility?
  • Disappointed with rebellion from their children?

th-3

TODAY: DISAPPOINTED BY UNTRUSTWORTHY FRIENDS

I thought she was my friend.

How could he say that?

So, all along she was pretending to be my friend.

I thought loyalty meant something to him. 

Disappointment from an untrustworthy friend destroys trust. Betrayal, gossip, emotional and verbal bullying in otherwise friendly relationships, wreck our trust. When our kids were children, and even teens, sometimes we stepped in and turned the tide–now the stakes are higher and situations more tenuous.

 

What is the best response when my adult child has been hurt by a friend?

Do we slash out in anger against the offender? Do we return snarky comments? Do we coach our adult child to get even? Do we recommend they “put their big girl panties on” and tough it out?

Psalm 34:14 reminds us to “turn away from evil and do good: seek peace and pursue it,” this means taking revenge is OUT. 

th-6

Often this takes supernatural power, and it is available.

“When the righteous cry for help, the Lord hears and delivers them out of all their troubles. The Lord is near to the brokenhearted and saves the crushed in spirit. Many are the afflictions of the righteous, but the Lord delivers him out of them all.”

Psalm 34:17-19

We know that Matthew 18 lays out a plan for SEEKING RECONCILIATION if someone has done something evil against us (or in this case our adult child). Obviously, we must recommend our adult children follow this path if they want to reconcile and not alienate their friends. However, often the offender does not accept that their behavior was wrong–and even deny that their actions were “sinful.”

th-5

 

Recently, one of my adult daughters was going through a rough patch with a friend. The friend just would not listen to reason and kept accusing my girl of mean-spiritedness toward her. I played referee for a few weeks with the “well, maybe if you said this she would see it your way” game. Finally, I had to admit:

I can’t give you the final answer here because you are going to have to love her or leave her… If this is a friend that you value you are going to have to forgive and overlook this. If you can’t do that, you inevitably are going to have to cut your losses and move on. Wait, and she may come back later.

 

A dear friend of mine recounted the tragic story of one of her daughter’s friends turned villain. Her story sounded strangely like another story I recently heard from another mom of an adult daughter. Both gals thought they deserved the “bad behavior’ by the other party. Both were in a very emotional dramatic relationships with these men. My friends both reminded me that when their girls called or came by the mom modeled PEACE in the storm. The girls were OVER THEIR HEAD in drama so the best these praying momma’s could do: WAIT AND MODEL CALM, PEACE, and CONFIDENCE. Words of PEACE and AFFIRMATION gave the young women confidence.

I believe in you.”

“You are worth fighting for!”

“You were made for great things!” 

“You are gonna come out of this!” 

 

 

th-4

 

Currently, I have a friend who is grieving over her adult son who is in a toxic relationship with a woman. Although the woman has lied to him, and manipulated him (he admits this), the son cannot break it off with this woman. Trying to lay the subject out logically, the mom even sought counsel from a therapist for her son. The young man still refuses, consistently making excuses for this woman’s behavior.  Now, the mom prays that his eyes will be opened.

th-2

 

Do our adult children always agree with us about healthy relationships?

OBVIOUSLY NOT!!! Something that seems like a major infraction in a relationship to us slides off them. Other times our adult children become angry and resentful of folks we see as well-meaning.

In giving advice about these situations: TREAD CAREFULLY.

th-1

As my friend with the adult son cannot FORCE her son to be offended and thus remove this woman from his life, neither can we FORCE our kids “get over it” when they feel offended.

We CAN PRAY for forgiveness and healing. We can pray with them for the right words to speak into the situation.

We SURVIVE through prayer and forgiveness and so will they.

We have to model how to forgive and when to let the friend go…

.

th

Did you really think the hard work of parenting ended with teaching them to drive?

I would love to hear your comments on how to deal with disappointments in the lives of your adult children dealing with HARD & HARSH RELATIONSHIPS! Please comment below.

Series: Disappointments

Unfortunately disappointments are inevitable for all of us.

What do you do when your Adult Child is

  • Disappointed by an untrustworthy friend?
  • Disappointed in a job situation?
  • Disappointed in academic possibilities?
  • Disappointed in marriage? 
  • Disappointed with infertility?
  • Disappointed with rebellion from their children?

These are the topics for the next few weeks. I would love your comments and feedback.

th-2

We can often give ourselves a “suck-it-up-buttercup” talk when a friend disappoints us, when a job promotion falls through, even when our marriage is going through a difficult patch.

But when our children are broken-hearted by the same circumstances: it is a different story. Most mothers have uttered the words, “but if you mess with my kid…” That sentence never has a happy ending.

th-3

OFTEN, we are MUCH more resilient than we expect our adult children to be.

Later, we will talk about making sure our adult children can stand up for themselves. But this series is about

EMOTIONAL SORROW we feel when our dear ones are hurt by outside forces. 

th-4

Resolved: there will be no revenge talk here. There will be no offer of “hit men” or getting even.

This series presents PRODUCTIVE WAYS to respond to YOUR ADULT CHILD when he or she is hurt. 

Our Hurting Children Grieve Us
As the Mama Bear, we hurt more when they hurt than we are hurt ourselves.

Obviously, I can’t make fairy godmother promises that I can wave my magic wand and make it all go away, but I do promise this:

IF WE WORK ON OUR HURTS AND DISAPPOINTMENTS TOGETHER OUR TIME AND OUR LIVES WILL BE MORE CREATIVE AND PRODUCTIVE.

We know that our adult children deserve us to be WISE and STRONG when they are hurting. Together, let’s work on these topics.

th-1

I WOULD LOVE YOUR INSIGHT AND MAYBE EVEN SOME OF THE DISAPPOINTING TOPICS YOU WOULD LIKE TO ADD TO THIS SERIES.

MY SCHOOL MOTTO IS #BETTERTOGETHER  and I feel that is precisely true of these topics.

 

BIG EVENTS: CELEBRATING THEIR SUCCESS

eFvkWhj_m
Celebrating our son John’s accomplishments are not hard when a room of 700 celebrate his hard work as legislative direction. Jake and Rachelle (left) have always supported Brandy and John (right) in this life saving work.

 

This is the last in a series of nine blogs concerning how to

CELEBRATE BIG EVENTS WITH OUR

ADULT CHILDREN!!

I HOPE this will be a dialogue between myself and other adult parents.
John testifying before Senate hearing
As a legislative director fighting for the life of the unborn, John wins some career success … right before another big battle. 
TODAY, I ASK MYSELF HOW CAN I BEST

CELEBRATE THEIR CAREER AND PERSONAL SUCCESS?

When our son Scott wanted to go into the military, celebrating that decision was HARD!

When our daughter Rachelle and her husband Jake decided not to go back to college after a life-altering car accident, celebrating that decision was difficult!

When our baby girl, Terah decided to support her new hubby by moving far away and taking a Nanny position while he built a business, I celebrated through tears.IMG_5383

WE CELEBRATE THEIR GOALS AND DREAMS–

EVEN WHEN IT IS HARD!

Independence in our adult children means that they will make choices we would not make. They will attempt adventures that would frighten us TO DEATH. But this is the journey of parenting adult children–learning to REJOICE AS THEY REJOICE!

 

IMG_0214
Scott thrived during his time in the military, even in the wet of Okinawa!  While there, Ted and I prayed for his safety and learned to celebrate his promotions and accomplishments. This was a ROUGH celebration.

 

What does success look like for your adult children? Probably, success looks very different for them than it did for you at their age. If you are a Baby Boomer, we had hard line metrics for determining our success. We knew the rank and the position we were going for and NOTHING WAS STOPPING US! We worked long hours and sacrificed our families to climb the ladder; often, we found the ladder was leaning against the wrong wall!

 

3.30.17 PEACH
Our girl, Kate, is a lobbyist in DC. She fights for health care for the poor every day.

 

WE SPELL SUCCESS DIFFERENTLY THAN OUR KIDS!

Our kids (especially our Millennials) are much more GLOBAL in their approach to success. They really DO include “life/work balance” in their evaluation of their own success. Our kids see the wins with their spouses and kids as big as their job performance: GET BEHIND THAT! CELEBRATE THEIR PERSONAL WINS!!!

 Rachelle brings healthy babies into the world by keeping moms strong and encouraged during birth. Long? Hard? Terrible hours? Bring it on…this is her calling. 

You may be in the position that your children’s goals and ambitions look different from yours, so you are having a hard time celebrating. When our son-in-law, Seth, went back to seminary with the intention of leaving his very lucrative job and going into ministry, his mom and dad were none too pleased. Since Ted and I have been in ministry for years (reads like “taken a vow of poverty”) we were thrilled!

But I get it: THERE ARE LOTS OF CAREERS AND JOB CHOICES THAT WOULD BE HARD FOR ME TO CELEBRATE OVER… BUT HARD IS WHAT WE DO!

37643388_10212643290742803_7416976300453134336_n
Charla and Seth at his ordination.

 

 

When our kids count their win as a success we count it that way also.  Here are some ways to acknowledge and celebrate:

  • Send cards of congratulations.
  • Post congrats on Facebook so the world sees you are rejoicing over this–it is the person not the project!
  • Verbally tell them how proud you are in front of other people. Practice this speech so your words are affirming of their character and hard work.
  • Attend any event where they are recognized.
  • Be present and listen when they talk about their accomplishments.
  • Remember how you felt when you saw him walk for the first time and respond accordingly! (yep, smile and clap!)
IMG_6451
Terah nannies Rachelle’s kids every day. What a great job! Aunting and nannying!

Every day Terah nannies Rachelle’s kids while Rachelle runs the construction company and goes to school. Terah, as a home schooler, remembers “sometimes they need to study and sometimes they need to cut-up!”

 IMG_6453

CELEBRATING YOUR CHILD BUILDS LOVE AND TRUST THAT BINDS YOU !

DON’T LET THE DETAILS GET IN THE WAY!

I would love to hear how you support your Adult Children’s success. Please leave comments below!